Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘diet’

excerpt from Elizabeth Pantley, The No-Cry Picky Eater Solution

Is your child unwilling to taste a new food? A picky eater often has to be

Click to Purchase in our Bookstore!

exposed to something new as many as ten to fifteen times before even tasting it! Children trust familiar things in their lives and are often suspicious of something new and different—this applies to food too. A food that has an unusual appearance, color, smell, or texture can be off-putting to a young child. That’s why repeated exposure helps. Eventually the unusual food becomes familiar, and at that point, the child becomes open to the idea of tasting it and giving it a fair evaluation. Knowing these facts gives us insight into how to introduce new foods and what to expect when we do. Here are a few tips:

~Begin by putting a tiny bit of the new food—such as two chickpeas or one Brussels sprout—on your child’s plate along with regular favorites. Don’t expect him to eat it, and don’t make a comment if he pulls it apart, smells it, or smashes it. Allow the experimentation to occur—it’s the first step to acceptance. If you’ve displayed the new food on your child’s plate eight to ten times and he still hasn’t eaten any, then gently encourage him to take “just one bite.”

~Pick one or two new foods at a time and put one on your child’s plate three or four times per week for several months. When he sees it enough times he’ll eventually give it a taste.

~Let your child observe you eating the new food. Mention to your spouse or a friend that you enjoy the food so that your child’s hears your comment. Studies tell us that when children are certain their parents or other important people in their lives really like a food (not just eat it out of duty, but actually enjoy it, they decide it’s a good thing to try for themselves.


Melissa, mother of of five-year-old Brenna, four-year-old Gianni, two-year-old Giulio, and nine-month-old Brydie shares her idea: “To introduce my kids to some new foods, I create a food treasure hunt. I have the kids play in their room so I can put out the food and make a map to each place with clues to the next food spot. They don’t get the next clue unless they try the food at each spot. I try to have only two new or not-so-keen-on foods along with about three things they do like along the way. The treasure at the end is dessert!”

~If you are eating with another adult, offer that person a taste of the new food. Ask her in advance to try it willingly and declare it tasty. When a child sees someone else being adventurous, he may be more willing to do so himself.

~After your child has tried the food and found it at least minimally acceptable (meaning he doesn’t spit it out or gag on it!), try putting it out as an appetizer before dinner is served. If your child is hungry, and it’s the first thing offered, he may actually eat a bite or two.


Catherine, mother to eight-year-old Ben and four-year-old Birdy tells her tale: “I put kale on his plate and put kale on his plate and put kale on his plate. My son tried it and grimaced, and we praised him for trying it. Pages flew off the calendar, and his beard grew down to the floor, and then one day he ate it without comment. And then one day he ate it and said, ‘This is actually not as bad as I thought.’ After which a pair of bluebirds draped the banner of joy around my shoulders!”

This article is an excerpt from The No-Cry Picky Eater Solution: Gentle Ways to Encourage Your Child to Eat—and Eat Healthy by Elizabeth Pantley. (McGraw-Hill, 2011)

Read Full Post »



Having a new baby brings extra expenses to every family’s budget. With these uncertain times, many families are losing jobs due to layoffs and the economy having ups and downs. To help you with ideas on how to save money, here are a few ideas:

  • Breastfeed Your Baby as long as possible, at least a year. Breastfeeding saves parents $1000 or more in formula expenses for a year and much more money and family energy because breastfed babies have fewer doctor visits and medical bills, less diaper rash, less stains on clothing, etc.
  •  Use Cloth Diapers as much as possible! Disposables cost 10-25 cents each! Babies use up to 6000 diapers in 2-3 years. That means parents spend at least $3000 (most times more) to use disposables until their child is potty trained! Using washable diapers can save you so much, not only with the first baby but also with the second and third!
  •  Stop buying Baby Wipes. Make your own or use a plain clean washcloth with warm water and a little baby wash.
  •  Cook at home and cook from scratch as much as possible. Fast food doubles to quadruples your food expense. Cook larger amounts and have more for lunches and leftover meals.
  • Pack lunch, snacks, and a bottle of water when you go out instead of shopping for fast food. 
  • Turn off lights when you leave a room.  Wear a sweater in the winter and use fans in the summer to save energy at home.  Put up a clothes line and hang your clothes and cloth diapers to dry instead of using the dryer all the time.
  • Plan your purchases! Make lists and stick to your lists when you shop.  Don’t allow yourself to “impulse buy.”

Things Many Moms Say You Can Do Without:

Changing Table – change baby on top of a dresser or bed.

Baby Bath Tub:  Wash baby in the sink or tub

Baby Towels and Robes

Baby Food:  Babies eat many foods from the table when ready.  Buy an inexpensive Baby Food Grinder (at Best Start).

Baby Wipes Warmer

Mobile:  Babies soon tire of these and you can make your own with a coat hanger and some pictures or toys hung from it.  Just be sure to keep it out of baby’s reach.

Infant shoes:  Purely decorative and unnecessary until baby can walk

Baby Dishes:  Baby can eat off clean high chair tray, place mat, or table.  They usually throw the dish on the floor anyway.

Read Full Post »

Have you heard pros and cons of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)? “It’s good – – -it’s bad, it’s no worse than sugar” . . . . .

Well I’m becoming more convinced each day that we need to eat as close to our great-grandparents diet as possible. The more processed the foods, the more chance for problems, additives or changes that make the food bad/dangerous for us, and especially pregnant moms, babies and children.

“It turns out that many foods sweetened with HFCS contain mercury, left as a residue in the production of caustic soda, a key ingredient in HFCS. And worst of all, the FDA and the industry have known about this potential toxin and has continued serving it up since at least 2005.”

Read this article from the Huffington Post for more information, then check your pantry for some of these food items that may contain mercury.

Click Here to go to Article

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: